Carlos Motta, Artist

COVID-19 Videos (2020)

“Times Square, Blue” is the first short video where I bike to some of NYC’s iconic public sites to think about how their meaning has been altered, for me, during the COVID-19 crisis. In this video, I ride on April 7, 2019, through a deserted but effulgent Times Square and reflected on the emotional toll that the crisis has had on me.

 

“Liberty Laid Bare” is the second short video where I bike to some of NYC’s iconic public sites to think about how their meaning has been altered, for me, during the COVID-19 crisis. In this video, I filmed the Statute of Liberty from Battery Park on April 12, 2020, thinking about the possibilities laid forth by this political crisis. Edited to an excerpt from “An Ending (Ascent)” by Brian Eno.

 

“EMPIRE” is the third short video where I bike to some of NYC’s iconic public sites to think about how their meaning has been altered, for me, during the COVID-19 crisis. In this video, on April 18, 2020, I visit the Empire State Building, and revisit the history of the building, which was built in 1931 as a symbol of hope in a country devastated by the Great Depression. Edited to the top song of the same year, “Dancing in the Dark” by Fred Waring & The Pennsylvanians.

 

“Distance” is the fourth short video where I bike to some of NYC’s iconic public sites to think about how their meaning has been altered, for me, during the COVID-19 crisis. In this music video poem from April 26, 2020, I visit the Manhattan Bridge and think about human traces, transfers, touch, absence, and imposed distance. Edited to an original soundtrack by Alejandra Tokatlian.

 


“PPE” is the fifth short video I made in quarantine. In this little performance-for-the-camera, shot in my NYC studio on April 30, 2020, I struggle with the personal protective equipment (PPE) that has become such part a big part of our daily life.

 

“The Weight of the World on Our Shoulders” is the sixth short video where I bike to some of NYC’s iconic public sites to think about how their meaning has been altered, for me, during the COVID-19 crisis. In this video, made in collaboration with musician Shawn Hansen and artist Luca Cruz Salvati, I go the Metropolitan Museum of Art (MET) on May 1st, International Workers’ Day, to visit the four caryatids that stand on the museum’s façade, designed in 1902 by Karl Britter, to represent Painting, Sculpture, Architecture, and Music and think about the future of artists, art workers, and art institutions in a broken economy.